Health Benefits of Eating Fish for Seniors

Fish, specifically oily fish, has numerous health benefits for people of all ages. The super food has been shown by researchers all around the world to help reduce your risk of cancer, inflammation, and a myriad of chronic diseases. By simply eating the food two to three times per week, you can greatly improve your health and keep your body fit. While fish is a great choice for anyone of any age, it is a particularly great food choice for seniors. Eating oily fish such as salmon, sardines or mackerel can greatly decrease loss of brain cells and, in turn, reduce a senior’s risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Keep reading to find out the other great benefits of incorporating oily fish into your weekly diet.

Cardiovascular Health

The great news about your cardiovascular health is that all types of fish, oily and non-oily, have been proven to reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease. While oily fish is far better for your cardiovascular health, you do not just have to eat oily fish to gain the cardiovascular benefits of fish. Studies have found that fish can help reduce your blood pressure and reduce your cholesterol levels in your blood and arteries. Oily fish in particular is rich with omega-3 fatty acids, which are great for cleaning up the fatty plaque in your arteries and keeping your heart pumping strong. The official consensus from researchers around the world is that to gain the optimum cardiovascular benefits from fish its best to eat one serving of oily fish per week and one serving of non-oily fish per week.

Dementia

Dementia is a degenerative neurological disorder that causes seniors to lose their memory very slowly. Since it is degenerative, the disease will progress as senior’s age and will cause them to lose their memories and many mental abilities. Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia that is the 6th leading cause of death in the world. Studies have been conducted around the world to determine whether or not specifically eating oily fish could help halt the degeneration of neurons in dementia and unfortunately the results were negative. However, nutritionists have found that eating oily fish can delay the loss of brain cells as people age. Everyone who ages will lose brain cells. A person’s brain loses density and neural connections as they age. This is completely normal, however if you eat oily fish twice per week, then you can retain some of your brain’s density and keep many of your neural connections active. So, while eating oily fish may not help you if you have been diagnosed with dementia, it can help you retain memories and neural connections as you age.

Eye Health

Your eyes are extremely important as you age. Many seniors may deal with slight vision loss as they age due to vision disorders such as cataracts and macular degeneration. Unfortunately, many seniors also deal with mobility disabilities, and if they are dealing with both mobility issues and eye issues, then they could be in serious danger. To help prevent any type of vision issue, including macular degeneration, you should consume oily fish at least twice per week. Researchers around the world have found that people who eat oily fish have a reduced risk of developing macular degeneration as they age. Plus, the omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish can reduce inflammation in your eyes and throughout your whole body.

Prostate Health

It is been estimated by numerous researchers that most male in the developed world will die with prostate cancer cells in their blood. While most of the time these cells do not proliferate, in some people, they can multiple vastly and cause serious issues. Prostate cancer is usually not fatal, but it is still cancer, and it still has the ability to metastasize and cause widespread growth of tumors throughout your body. If you are a male, then studies have shown that incorporating oily fish into your diet can greatly reduce your risk of developing prostate cancer. That means that if you simply eat fish twice per week, then you can rest happily in knowing that you are working hard to keep your body healthy and your cancer risk low.

Inflammatory Conditions

Eating fish is an easy way to keep your health in check. There are numerous varieties of fish that all have different price points and flavors, so it is really difficult not to find a fish that is both affordable and tastes great. Fish comes in two great varieties: oily and non-oily. Both types offer great general health benefits including helping to reduce widespread inflammation in your body. Inflammation is the key component to many chronic and debilitating diseases including cancer, heart disease, stroke and arthritis. By reducing your overall inflammation you can regain your health and stay strong as you age.

While fish does come in two different, distinct varieties, researchers have found that oily fish has far more health benefits than non-oily fish. Typical oily fish include salmon, fresh tuna, mackerel, sardines, trout, carp, and orange roughy. All of these fish contain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential to keeping your body strong. These fatty acids can help improve your blood circulation, reduce the amount of plaque in your arteries, reduce swelling and pain in your joints, protect your nerves and neurons and even protect your eyes. Plus, omega-3 fatty acids are a great immunity booster. Eating oily fish twice per week can greatly improve your health and keep you strong as you age. So, the next time you visit the grocery store, take a look at the fish isle. You may just be able to add a few extra healthy years to your life by consuming oily fish twice per week. People of all ages should aim to consume oily fish this often; however seniors especially will gain a myriad of health benefits from oily fish. By consuming oily fish twice per week they should notice that they feel better and have more energy after only consuming fish for a few weeks.

 

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